Thursday, 2 February 2012

How will Google’s Panda update affect your SEO?

Google has recently updated their search engine algorithm with the latest Panda update. They have applied the changes in the US and it has created controversies and havoc in the internet industry. Now the question is, how will this change affect your site’s SEO once it is released all over the world?

A big question mark
I for one am excited and at the same time a bit anxious on how it will affect some of my blogs. There have been some civilian casualties in the US such as Cult of Mac (which is a blog that discusses about Mac) and other seemingly innocent websites that do not practice content farming at all.

The question we need to ask ourselves is ‘if there have indeed been any civilian casualties, what are the chances that I might be one of them when the change is implemented in my country?’ The bigger question you need to ask yourself is, ‘how does this change affect my site’s SEO?’
The purpose of the Panda

The change is implemented in order to eliminate ‘low quality’ content, or in other words, spammy content trying to rank in the search engines. You have to understand that Google is only trying its best in eliminating results that are not relevant or not useful because its users have requested it.

The Panda update has affected sites like Mahalo, Ezine articles, Wisegeek and a lot of other websites. I was personally surprised that Ezine articles was affected because they do look over and edit their articles (they even reject some) – although perhaps quite loosely. Now they said that they’ll be more strict with the articles they are accepting.

Some websites that were affected are: (taken from

How does this affect your SEO?
Publishing content just for the heck of traffic is not a good idea. This is the main reason why Google made the update – because a lot of sites take a lot of content just for them to attract more visitors from the search engines to go to their site and give some impressions and clicks to the ads.

They don’t really care about the quality of the content as much as the traffic they are getting from it. We have to always keep in mind that people want real, useful, quality content – and Google is just trying its best to deliver us that which we desire. True, there may have been some unforseen and perhaps unjust casualties, but that’s why it’s called a ‘change’ I’m sure Google will try to patch things up in due time.

You should be more mindful of the things that you publish. Make sure it’s unique, original and helpful to people. Don’t make articles just to suck-up to search engines as some people do. If you have local content farming websites, try to look at which keywords you could grab from them when the Panda update is implemented in your country. Perhaps you can be the one to rank first for that keyword phrase that you want since they’re getting kicked off the picture.

In the end, SEO is a zero-sum game. If the content farms are getting kicked off the SERPs, then the content producers get to rank higher. Take this opportunity to do so.

Tips for Keeps: Start looking out for local content farms in your country. Look at some of the articles they are ranking for in your niche, create content that will allow you to rank for the same keyword phrase and wait for the Panda update to come around.

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How Google's Panda Update Changed SEO Best Practices Forever

It's here! Google has released Panda update 2.2, just as Matt Cutts said they would at SMX Advanced here in Seattle a couple of weeks ago. This time around, Google has - among other things - improved their ability to detect scraper sites and banish them from the SERPs. Of course, the Panda updates are changes to Google's algorithm and are not merely manual reviews of sites in the index, so there is room for error (causing devastation for many legitimate webmasters and SEOs).

A lot of people ask what parts of their existing SEO practice they can modify and emphasize to recover from the blow, but alas, it's not that simple. In this week's Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses how the Panda updates work and, more importantly, how Panda has fundamentally changed the best practices for SEO. Have you been Panda-abused? Do you have any tips for recuperating? Let us know in the comments!


Video Transcription

Howdy, SEOmoz fans. Welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week, we're talking about the very exciting, very interesting, very controversial Google Panda update.

Panda, also known as Farmer, was this update that Google came out with in March of this year, of 2011, that rejiggered a bunch of search results and pushed a lot of websites down in the rankings, pushed some websites up in the rankings, and people have been concerned about it ever since. It has actually had several updates and new versions of that implementation and algorithm come out. A lot of people have all these questions like, "Ah, what's going on around Panda?" There have been some great blog posts on SEOmoz talking about some of the technical aspects. But I want to discuss in this Whiteboard Friday some of the philosophical and theoretical aspects and how Google Panda really changes the way a lot of us need to approach SEO.

So let's start with a little bit of Panda history. Google employs an engineer named Navneet Panda. The guy has done some awesome work. In fact, he was part of a patent application that Bill Slawski looked into where he found a great way to scale some machine learning algorithms. Now, machine learning algorithms, as you might be aware, are very computationally expensive and they take a long time to run, particularly if you have extremely large data sets, both of inputs and of outputs. If you want, you can research machine learning. It is an interesting fun tactic that computer scientists use and programmers use to find solutions to problems. But basically before Panda, machine learning scalability at Google was at level X, and after it was at the much higher level Y. So that was quite nice. Thanks to Navneet, right now they can scale up this machine learning.

What Google can do based on that is take a bunch of sites that people like more and a bunch of sites that people like less, and when I say like, what I mean is essentially what the quality raters, Google's quality raters, tell them this site is very enjoyable. This is a good site. I'd like to see this high in the search results. Versus things where the quality raters say, "I don't like to see this." Google can say, "Hey, you know what? We can take the intelligence of this quality rating panel and scale it using this machine learning process."

Here's how it works. Basically, the idea is that the quality raters tell Googlers what they like. They answer all these questions, and you can see Amit Singhal and Matt Cutts were interviewed by Wired Magazine. They talked about some of the things that were asked of these quality raters, like, "Would you trust this site with your credit card? Would you trust the medical information that this site gives you with your children? Do you think the design of this site is good?" All sorts of questions around the site's trustworthiness, credibility, quality, how much they would like to see it in the search results. Then they compare the difference.

The sites that people like more, they put in one group. The sites that people like less, they put in another group. Then they look at tons of metrics. All these different metrics, numbers, signals, all sorts of search signals that many SEOs suspect come from user and usage data metrics, which Google has not historically used as heavily. But they think that they use those in a machine learning process to essentially separate the wheat from the chaff. Find the ones that people like more and the ones that people like less. Downgrade the ones they like less. Upgrade the ones they like more. Bingo, you have the Panda update.

So, Panda kind of means something new and different for SEO. As SEOs, for a long time you've been doing the same kind of classic things. You've been building good content, making it accessible to search engines, doing good keyword research, putting those keywords in there, and then trying to get some links to it. But you have not, as SEOs, we never really had to think as much or as broadly about, "What is the experience of this website? Is it creating a brand that people are going to love and share and reward and trust?" Now we kind of have to think about that.

It is almost like the job of SEO has been upgraded from SEO to web strategist. Virtually everything you do on the Internet with your website can impact SEO today. That is especially true following Panda. The things that they are measuring is not, oh, these sites have better links than these sites. Some of these sites, in fact, have much better links than these sites. Some of these sites have what you and I might regard, as SEOs, as better content, more unique, robust, quality content, and yet, people, quality raters in particular, like them less or the things, the signals that predict that quality raters like those sites less are present in those types of sites.

Let's talk about a few of the specific things that we can be doing as SEOs to help with this new sort of SEO, this broader web content/web strategy portion of SEO.

First off, design and user experience. I know, good SEOs have been preaching design user experience for years because it tends to generate more links, people contribute more content to it, it gets more social signal shares and tweets and all this other sort of good second order effect. Now, it has a first order effect impact, a primary impact. If you can make your design absolutely beautiful, versus something like this where content is buffeted by advertising and you have to click next, next, next a lot. The content isn't all in one page. You cannot view it in that single page format. Boy, the content blocks themselves aren't that fun to read, even if it is not advertising that's surrounding them, even if it is just internal messaging or the graphics don't look very good. The site design feels like it was way back in the 1990s. All that stuff will impact the ability of this page, this site to perform. And don't forget, Google has actually said publicly that even if you have a great site, if you have a bunch of pages that are low quality on that site, they can drag down the rankings of the rest of the site. So you should try and block those for us or take them down. Wow. Crazy, right? That's what a machine learning algorithm, like Panda, will do. It will predicatively say, "Hey, you know what? We're seeing these features here, these elements, push this guy down."

Content quality matters a lot. So a lot of time, in the SEO world, people will say, "Well, you have to have good, unique, useful content." Not enough. Sorry. It's just not enough. There are too many people making too much amazing stuff on the Internet for good and unique and grammatically correct and spelled properly and describes the topic adequately to be enough when it comes to content. If you say, "Oh, I have 50,000 pages about 50,000 different motorcycle parts and I am just going to go to Mechanical Turk or I am going to go outsource, and I want a 100 word, two paragraphs about each one of them, just describe what this part is." You think to yourself, "Hey, I have good unique content." No, you have content that is going to be penalized by Panda. That is exactly what Panda is designed to do. It is designed to say this is content that someone wrote for SEO purposes just to have good unique content on the page, not content that makes everyone who sees it want to share it and say wow. Right?

If I get to a page about a motorcycle part and I am like, "God, not only is this well written, it's kind of funny. It's humorous. It includes some anecdotes. It's got some history of this part. It has great photos. Man, I don't care at all about motorcycle parts, and yet, this is just a darn good page. What a great page. If I were interested, I'd be tweeting about this, I'd share it. I'd send it to my uncle who buys motorcycles. I would love this page." That's what you have to optimize for. It is a totally different thing than optimizing for did I use the keyword at least three times? Did I put it in the title tag? Is it included in there? Is the rest of the content relevant to the keywords? Panda changes this. Changes it quite a bit.

Finally, you are going to be optimizing around user and usage metrics. Things like, when people come to your site, generally speaking compared to other sites in your niche or ranking for your keywords, do they spend a good amount of time on your site, or do they go away immediately? Do they spend a good amount of time? Are they bouncing or are they browsing? If you have a good browse rate, people are browsing 2, 3, 4 pages on average on a content site, that's decent. That's pretty good. If they're browsing 1.5 pages on some sites, like maybe specific kinds of news sites, that might actually be pretty good. That might be better than average. But if they are browsing like 1.001 pages, like virtually no one clicks on a second page, that might be weird. That might hurt you. Your click-through rate from the search results. When people see your title and your snippet and your domain name, and they go, "Ew, I don't know if I want to get myself involved in that. They've got like three hyphens in their domain name, and it looks totally spammy. I'm not going to get involved." Then that click-through rate is probably going to suffer and so are your rankings.

They are going to be looking at things like the diversity and quantity of traffic that comes to your site. Do lots of people from all around the world or all around your local region, your country, visit your website directly? They can measure this through Chrome. They can measure it through Android. They can measure it through the Google toolbar. They have all this user and usage metrics. They know where people are going on the Internet, where they spend time, how much time they spend, and what they do on those pages. They know about what happens from the search results too. Do people click from a result and then go right back to the search results and perform another search? Clearly, they were unhappy with that. They can take all these metrics and put them into the machine learning algorithm and then have Panda essentially recalculate. This why you see essentially Google doesn't issue updates every day or every week. It is about every 30 or 40 days that a new Panda update will come out because they are rejiggering all this stuff.

One of the things that people who get hit by Panda come up to me and say, "God, how are we ever going to get out of Panda? We've made all these changes. We haven't gotten out yet." I'm like, "Well, first off, you're not going to get out of it until they rejigger the results, and then there is no way that you are going to get out of it unless you change the metrics around your site." So if you go into your Analytics and you see that people are not spending longer on your pages, they are not enjoying them more, they are not sharing them more, they are not naturally linking to them more, your branded search traffic is not up, your direct type in traffic is not up, you see that none of these metrics are going up and yet you think you have somehow fixed the problems that Panda tries to solve for, you probably haven't.

I know this is frustrating. I know it's a tough issue. In fact, I think that there are sites that have been really unfairly hit. That sucks and they shouldn't be and Google needs to work on this. But I also know that I don't think Google is going to be making many changes. I think they are very happy with the way that Panda has gone from a search quality perspective and from a user happiness perspective. Their searchers are happier, and they are not seeing as much junk in the results. Google likes the way this is going. I think we are going to see more and more of this over time. It could even get more aggressive. I would urge you to work on this stuff, to optimize around these things, and to be ready for this new form of SEO.

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Tuesday, 31 January 2012

Is There Guaranteed SEO ?

We live in a world of skepticism. Oversupply and lack of trained staff really makes you question our own shadow. This reality is not at all different in the world of SEO.

A high percentage of companies that will hire us to do the positioning of their websites, require assurance that we will put in the first position of Google. In part, the situation is aggravated when other SEO companies, say "dishonest", offering all kinds of impossible guarantees to captivate only the most gullible. In fact some charge for positions ("X" amount for the first position of Google, "Y" amount for the second, etc...)

I regret to report that the situation is not as pretty as some paint.

In SEO there are no guarantees...

I will explain why: our job is to ensure that the websites of our clients meet all domestic requirements for Google and other search engines, considered for the top spots. At the same time, we create an SEO campaign "off page", increasing the popularity and recommendation thereof by other pages (Link Building).

We do this to please the all-mighty Google and put us in the top positions.

But what happens when Google decides that other sites deserve to be in a better position than our customers? Perhaps because these other sites have much more time on the market that the customer or because they have an SEO budget much higher than that our customers are willing to pay? In the end it is Google who has the last word, not us.

Making a comparison with the real world, SEO is like asking jimmy, which speaks well of his friend Carlos Laura for her to consider as a good match. What guarantees can give Juan Carlos to Laura want, at least, go out with him? No.... Only you can guarantee that Laura will speak highly of Carlos, but without promising anything. In this case John is all we do SEO, Carlos are the websites of our customers and Laura is Google.

We do our work by following all the tips and guidelines that Google itself recommends Webmasters, but cannot guarantee that we will have a 100% effective and 100% manage to position the pages in the first position in Google and in less than 30 days. Some sites take weeks, others take months and others, Google just do not feel like it!

The only cases where we have failed so far in our company have been to sites that Google has penalized some time (before we did the positioning them) and when we have had to optimize it, there is much we can do because the damage has been caused. When Google says "NO" is NO.
The same applies to the Link Building Service. Generate backlinks in hundreds of pages, including a report in excel deliver each and every one of the websites that contain links contracted, but cannot guarantee that the owners of those pages will not delete the links at some point (in those cases profiles we are talking about 2.0).

All we can guarantee is that our work is done with professionalism, knowledge and experience. The results are, in most cases that our customers expect. Only difficult promised before doing so.

How long will it take? Is impossible to predict. Will we achieve the very first place in Google? It is impossible to guarantee it. Will we do everything possible, everything in our knowledge and experience, to place our client’s websites at the top of Google? You bet!

Monday, 30 January 2012

SEO Expert Ravinder

Hi, I' am Ravinder Kumar an SEO Expert from Ambala, India providing professional SEO Services and all kinds of online marketing to ensure increased traffic and sales and I also helps to small businesses to improve their ranking on search engines. I only believe in quality relevant SEO services that can boost any business into the top search results.

Although I personally believe to be "expert" does not necessarily know everything about a certain subject, I do believe that in order to become an accomplished performer on any technique, art or discipline requires the inevitable combination of "Knowing" + "Knowing Apply".

The theme of SEO (Search Engine Optimization) or, in the Castilian translation "SEO"Is a large topic and full of small details, many of them" alleged "and not" asserted "that the truth makes this technique more like a game than a science.
This page will apply to many SEO techniques "monitoring" as an experiment, the effectiveness or irrelevance of the same.